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Chapter 1: Course Development and Revision



 
This chapter is designed to make the internal process of developing/revising courses transparent and easier; simply click on the appropriate handbook section (located below) to take the quick link to the desired content.


Chapter 1 Section A: Course Development for Catalog Courses



FAQ: What course number should I use?



Chapter 1 Section B: Course Development for Topics Courses


FAQ: What is the difference between a catalog course and a topics course?


Chapter 1 Section C: Catalog Course Revision (Action Item)



Chapter 1 Section D: Topics Course Revision (Information Item)


FAQ: What is the difference between an action item and an information only item?


Chapter 1 Section E: Catalog Course Deactivation


Chapter 1 Section F: Catalog Course Discontinuance


FAQ: What is the difference between a course deactivation and course discontinuance?











 


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Chapter 1 Section A: Course Development for Catalog Courses
We recommend that you begin the course development process by engaging in meaningful conversations with your departmental colleagues.  New courses may require additional resources and/or internal review; please be sure to work closely with the sponsoring department chair to ensure that all requirements have been met. 

The course developer and/or the sponsoring department chair should attend and be prepared to address questions at the appropriate department meeting, Curriculum Committee meeting and Faculty Council meeting.

Catalog Course Development:
step 1: discuss proposed course with sponsoring department colleagues and department chair
step 2: develop course curriculum and complete the new course proposal form, including a master course syllabus

Catalog Course Internal Review and Approval:
step 3: review and approval by the sponsoring academic department; the sponsoring department chair forwards approved proposal to the Curriculum Committee chair   
step 4: review and approval by the Curriculum Committee; the Curriculum Committee chair forwards approved proposals to Faculty Council and proposals in need of revision back to the sponsoring department
step 5: review and approval by the Faculty Council; the Faculty Council chair forwards approved proposals to the Vice President of Academic Affairs (VPAA) and proposals in need of revision back to the sponsoring department
step 6: review and approval by the VPAA


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FAQ: What course number should I use?
In general our course numbering at CCC uses the following protocol:
090 - 099 Basic skills courses (i.e. developmental, non-credit bearing courses)
100 Credit bearing courses that earn free-elective credit only
101 - 199 Credit bearing freshman level courses
200 - 299 Credit bearing sophomore level courses

Special considerations:
175 & 275 are reserved for internship courses
180 & 280 are reserved for topics courses
190 & 290 are reserved for independent study courses





 


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Chapter 1 Section B: Course Development for Topics Courses
We recommend that you begin the course development process by engaging in meaningful conversations with your departmental colleagues. New courses may require additional resources and/or internal review; please be sure to work closely with the sponsoring department chair to ensure that all requirements have been met.

The course developer and/or the sponsoring department chair should attend and be prepared to address questions at the appropriate department meeting, Curriculum Committee meeting and Faculty Council meeting.

Topics Course Development:
step 1: discuss proposed course with sponsoring department colleagues and department chair
step 2: develop course curriculum and complete the new course proposal form, including a master course syllabus (note that the course numbers 180 & 280 are reserved for topics courses)

Topics Course Internal Review and Approval:
step 3: review and approval by the sponsoring academic department; the sponsoring department chair forwards approved proposal to the Curriculum Committee chair
step 4: review (information only) by the Curriculum Committee; the Curriculum Committee chair forwards proposals to Faculty Council
step 5: review (information only) and approval by the Faculty Council; the Faculty Council chair forwards proposals to the Vice President of Academic Affairs (VPAA)
step 6: review and approval by the VPAA
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FAQ: What is the difference between a catalog course and a topics course?
Catalog courses are permanent in nature and must undergo a complete review and approval process.  All courses required in academic programs and certificates must be catalog courses.

Topics courses require approval by the sponsoring department and the VPAA only and provide a means to offer temporary courses.  Topics courses are normally granted onetime approval and may not be offered more than two times before they must undergo the new catalog course review and approval process.  Topics courses are temporary in nature and allow for faculty innovation and collaboration.









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Chapter 1 Section C: Catalog Course Revision (Action Item)
We recommend that you begin the course revision process by engaging in meaningful conversations with your departmental colleagues and those colleagues who use the course in question as a service course.

The course revision initiator and/or the sponsoring department chair should attend and be prepared to address questions at the appropriate department meeting, Curriculum Committee meeting and Faculty Council meeting.

Catalog Course Revision:
step 1: discuss proposed course revision with sponsoring department colleagues, sponsoring department chair and those colleagues who use the course in question as a service course
step 2: complete the course revision form, including revising the master course syllabus

Catalog Course Revision Review and Approval:
step 3: review and approval by the sponsoring academic department; the sponsoring department chair forwards approved proposal to the Curriculum Committee chair
step 4: review and approval by the Curriculum Committee; the Curriculum Committee chair forwards approved proposals to Faculty Council and proposals in need of revision back to the sponsoring department
step 5: review and approval by the Faculty Council; the Faculty Council chair forwards approved proposals to the Vice President of Academic Affairs (VPAA) and proposals in need of revision back to the sponsoring department
step 6: review and approval by the VPAA
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FAQ: What is the difference between an action item and an information only item?
Action items and information only items refer to CCC-based levels of review; while major changes and minor changes to curriculum refer to SUNY and NYSED levels of review.

Action items have an impact beyond the sponsoring department and must undergo a complete review and approval process. Any change to a catalog course's master course syllabus is an action item.

Information only items require approval by the sponsoring department and the VPAA only and provide a means to revise temporary courses and to officially inform faculty advisors of significant course changes that do not impact the master course syllabus.








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Chapter 1 Section D: Topics Course Revision (Information Item)
We recommend that you begin the course revision process by engaging in meaningful conversations with your departmental colleagues.

The course revision initiator and/or the sponsoring department chair should attend and be prepared to address questions at the appropriate department meeting, Curriculum Committee meeting and Faculty Council meeting.

Course Revision:
step 1: discuss proposed course revision with sponsoring department colleagues and chair
step 2: complete the course revision form, including revising the master course syllabus

Course Revision Review and Approval:
step 3: review and approval by the sponsoring academic department; the sponsoring department chair forwards approved proposal to the Curriculum Committee chair
step 4: review (information only) by the Curriculum Committee; the Curriculum Committee chair forwards proposals to Faculty Council
step 5: review (information only) and approval by the Faculty Council; the Faculty Council chair forwards proposals to the Vice President of Academic Affairs (VPAA)
step 6: review and approval by the VPAA
.


FAQ: What is the difference between an action item and an information only item?
Action items and information only items refer to CCC-based levels of review; while major changes and minor changes to curriculum refer to SUNY and NYSED levels of review.

Action items have an impact beyond the sponsoring department and must undergo a complete review and approval process. Any change to a catalog course's master course syllabus is an action items.

Information only items require approval by the sponsoring department and the VPAA only and provide a means to revise temporary courses and to officially inform faculty advisors of significant course changes that do not impact the master course syllabus.








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Chapter 1 Section E: Catalog Course Deactivation
We recommend that you begin the course deactivation process by engaging in meaningful conversations with your departmental colleagues.

The course deactivation initiator and/or the sponsoring department chair should attend and be prepared to address questions at the appropriate department meeting, Curriculum Committee meeting and Faculty Council meeting.

Catalog Course Deactivation:
step 1: discuss proposed course deactivation with sponsoring department colleagues and chair
step 2: complete the deactivation/discontinuance form

Catalog Course Deactivation Review and Approval:
step 3: review and approval by the sponsoring academic department; the sponsoring department chair forwards approved proposal to the Curriculum Committee chair
step 4: review (information only) by the Curriculum Committee; the Curriculum Committee chair forwards proposals to Faculty Council
step 5: review (information only) and approval by the Faculty Council; the Faculty Council chair forwards proposals to the Vice President of Academic Affairs (VPAA)
step 6: review and approval by the VPAA








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Chapter 1 Section F: Catalog Course Discontinuance
We recommend that you begin the course discontinuance process by engaging in meaningful conversations with your departmental colleagues and those colleagues who use the course in question as a service course.

The course discontinuance initiator and/or the sponsoring department chair should attend and be prepared to address questions at the appropriate department meeting, Curriculum Committee meeting and Faculty Council meeting.

Course Discontinuance:
step 1: discuss proposed course discontinuance with sponsoring department colleagues, sponsoring department chair and those colleagues who use the course in question as a service course
step 2: complete the deactivation/discontinuance form

Course Discontinuance Review and Approval:
step 3: review and approval by the sponsoring academic department; the sponsoring department chair forwards approved proposal to the Curriculum Committee chair
step 4: review (information only) by the Curriculum Committee; the Curriculum Committee chair forwards proposals to Faculty Council
step 5: review (information only) and approval by the Faculty Council; the Faculty Council chair forwards proposals to the Vice President of Academic Affairs (VPAA) step 6: review and approval by the VPAA
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FAQ: What is the difference between a course deactivation and course discontinuance?
A catalog course deactivation removes the course from the CCC catalog, but the course remains active in the VPAA's office.  This may be done to reassess the course need.  A course that has been deactivated can be offered as a directed study and does not need to go through the formal review and approval process to be offered on the CCC schedule.

A catalog course discontinuance means CCC will no longer offer said course and credits cannot be
awarded for the course after the effective date.  A course that has been discontinued will need to go through the formal review and approval process to be offered on the CCC schedule.

Courses that are required as part of an academic program or certificate cannot be deactivated or discontinued.  As topics courses do not appear in the college catalog and are temporary in nature, they do not need to be deactivated or discontinued.